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GOLF HOME England Golf Ireland Golf New Zealand Golf Scandinavia Golf Scotland Golf Wales Golf

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GOLF CLUBS IN—


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— Center of the Golfing Universe —

TAYMOUTH CASTLE

TAYMOUTH CASTLE

GOLF COURSE

KENMORE, PERTHSHIRE, CENTRAL SCOTLAND

A HIDDEN GEM IN SCOTLAND'S CENTRAL HIGHLAND

COURSE CLOSED FOR REDEVELOPMENT SINCE 2011.
PROJECT STALLED. GRAND RE-OPENING — UNKNOWN.
READ ON TO LEARN ABOUT THIS HISTORIC COURSE HELD IN LIMBO BY CONCEALED INVESTMENT GROUP.

 

 The home 18th hole finishes the Taymouth Castle course in front of its namesake castle. Photo © HOME AT FIRST.


Scratch golfers may have found the original Taymouth Castle Golf Course too short or too straight.
High handicappers may have found its rough cost them a bucket of balls to get through eighteen.
But no one complained about the experience of playing golf on a classic Braid course in
prototypical Highlands scenery on the former estate of the Earls of Breadalbane.

Has all this been lost in a frenzy of shortsighted developmental greed?

Photo
© HOME AT FIRST

Taymouth Castle Golf Course

Kenmore, Perthshire, Central Scotland PH15 2NT UK
Tel: +44 (0)1887 830228 (APR-SEP)   Tel:+44 (0)1887 830205 (OCT-MAR)
E-mail:
o.Kelly@btconnect.com                Web Site: TAYMOUTH CASTLE

A monument to a simpler time that still exists
here in the Highlands, a time when Nature and
Golf co-existed rather than competed, before
 Bertha was Big, before woods were metal, and
 before James Braid and his seminal philosophy
of golf course design was largely bulldozed.

 

          I confess. I prefer golf courses with eclectic layouts to those with predictable, mainstream designs. I prefer predominantly natural courses with minimal alteration of their setting to those that have been highly re-engineered. I prefer discovering relatively unknown, underappreciated, and underpriced tracks to playing extremely popular, fashionable, and usually overpriced golf courses. I prefer golf courses that welcome me like a prodigal member returning to the fold to those that sniff at me like they’re doing me a favor to take too much of my money to play 18 holes of this simple, maddening game. I prefer golf courses with historic pedigrees far more than spanking new resort theme park golf courses. And, I prefer simple courses in extraordinary settings to extraordinary courses in simple settings. My biases. You don’t have to agree. Golf has room for all kinds.
         Scotland, I needn’t write, ranks at the top of anyone’s list of the world’s premier golf destinations. But not every region of Scotland has the cachet to golfers that
St. Andrews and the Fife Coast (or the Ayrshire Coast, or the Sutherland Coast, or the Lothian Coast) have. Some regions of SCOTLAND — especially inland where the challenges of links golf are necessarily supplanted by the challenges of rolling parkland — rarely show up on any golf vacationer’s Scottish itinerary.

GOLF COMES TO THE SCOTTISH HEARTLAND
          One of these regions is
Perthshire. Perthshire — CENTRAL SCOTLAND’s heartland county — is highly regarded for its romantic Highlands beauty: dark lochs, endless mountains, remote glens, and stone villages of hardy residents fortified with a mixture of resolve, shyness, suspicion, welcoming, and humor. Flat land in Perthshire is mostly rich bottom land along its major rivers: Earn, Tay, and Tummel and their tributaries that harvest the waters of myriad bens and glens. Practical Scots normally reserve golf and other leisure pursuits to land otherwise useless for commerce or agriculture. The bottom land along the rivers of Perthshire is much desired for farming. Golf on bottom land would be a misuse of prime resources. So, most golf in Perthshire is found in locations too hilly, too rocky, or too prone to flooding to be of much use for agriculture, or, if only a small piece of bottom land be available, communities might devote such limited prime land to a 9-hole golf course.

Highland Perthshire is blessed with fabulous scenery, but with precious little bottom land. Hence it has few 18-hole golf courses. This view, from the summit of Ben Lawers, looks east along Loch Tay toward Kenmore and Taymouth Castle Golf Course, in the right center background. Photo © HOME AT FIRST.


Highland Perthshire is blessed with fabulous scenery, but with precious little bottom land.
Hence it has few 18-hole golf courses. This view, from the summit of Ben Lawers, looks east
along Loch Tay toward Kenmore and Taymouth Castle Golf Course, in the right center background.

Photo
© HOME AT FIRST

          Small wonder that golf courses in Perthshire are few and far between, and that fewer still are of the 18-hole championship length variety. Of these latter most exist as an expression of the extraordinary wealth of the community, as a show of ostentation rarely possible among normally severe and austere Highlands Scots. The good burghers of Crieff in south central Perthshire — the rich market town on the edge of Lowlands where Highlanders like Rob Roy MacGregor drove their cattle (and maybe cattle that belonged to others, too) to be sold — built their fine Ferntower golf course on a hillside just northeast of town. Likewise, the town fathers of Blairgowrie in eastern Perthshire displayed their wealth gleaned from the surrounding flax fields with grand ostentation by building and expanding an original 9-hole course on hilly land south of Blairgowrie into two excellent championship courses.
          The coming of the railway also resulted in the construction of quality golf courses in Perthshire. In 1908 as the word spread that the little town of
Pitlochry on the northeastern corner of the Highlands of Perthshire was a very accessible resort destination along Scotland’s main north-south rail line, the town closed its 9-hole bottom land course in town along the River Tummel and imported the famous golf architect Willie Fernie from Troon to build a new 18-hole course on hilly farmland northwest of town. The wealthy landowner who provided the land saw the course as another attraction to draw vacationers to one of the few Highlands towns reachable by mainline train.

 

          In southern Perthshire, another railway saw building a golf resort as a way to attract passengers to its trains. In the 1920s it constructed a huge hotel and two championship golf courses in the hills just north of its line from Stirling to Perth (with through trains from Glasgow, Edinburgh, and London), and built a station stop exclusively for the new golf resort complex, called Gleneagles. Gleneagles is Perthshire’s famous contribution to high-rolling international golf. Its original two courses, King’s and Queen’s, were designed by five-time British Open champion James Braid of Earlsferry on the Fife Coast, the Pete Dye of his day, whose designs of 150+ courses in the British Isles helped define course architecture in the first third of the 20th century, a time of great expansion of the game. Braid’s courses are rarely long by today’s standards, but they are always challenging, interesting, and rarely gimmicky. Braid was a master at exploiting the natural features of a site to get the greatest challenge and variety with the minimum of alteration to the landscape. It’s no surprise that many of the finest

James Braid, 5-time winner of The Open Championship and ubiquitous designer of golf courses during the golf rush of the early 20th century through the British Isles. Photo courtesy the James Braid Society.
James Braid, 5-time winner of
The Open Championship and
 ubiquitous designer of golf
courses during the golf rush
of the early 20th century
throughout the British Isles.

Photo courtesy the James Braid Society

 

courses (seaside linkses as well as interior parkland

tracks) in Scotland were designed or improved by Scotland’s most prolific master, James Braid. Include most of Perthshire’s best courses: Gleneagles Kings and Queens, Blairgowrie Rosemount, and Crieff Ferntower and Dornock.

THE HISTORY OF TAYMOUTH CASTLE & GOLF COURSE
          An exception exists, as if to prove the rule. In the heart of Perthshire an elegant 18-hole course lines the mildly undulating, rich bottom land of the
River Tay about one mile east of its emergence from 20-mile-long Loch Tay. No railway is near. The course lies on a private estate just east of Kenmore, a pretty, sleepy, Highlands village best known for its graceful stone arch bridge across the River Tay at its exit from the loch, and for the venerable Kenmore Hotel, a sprawling, whitewashed country hostelry claiming the status as Scotland’s oldest existing inn, tracing its establishment to the medieval year of 1542.

 
Kenmore's graceful stone arch bridge spans the River Tay near its exit from Loch Tay.
Taymouth Castle Golf Course lies one mile down river.

Photo
© HOME AT FIRST

          When the Kenmore Hotel first opened its doors it was a hostelry on the new estate of Earls of Breadalbane, who had just decided to relocate from Kilchurn Castle in the western part of their extensive territory to a new seat of power, Balloch Castle, they were having built along the River Tay just east of Loch Tay. Sixteenth century Balloch Castle served the Breadalbane branch of the powerful Campbell clan well and long. From Balloch — located in the approximate middle of their territory — the Breadalbanes controlled a belt of Scotland extending almost from the North Sea to the Atlantic.
          The Breadalbane family prospered as wealthy nobles well into the 19th century. When they decided that medieval Balloch Castle had outlived its usefulness, they had it largely torn down and rebuilt in the form of a huge, modern manor house in the romantic form of a crenellated, fortified castle. After decades of construction in the first half of the 19th century the new castle incorporated so little of old Balloch Castle that it was renamed
Taymouth Castle. The castle was largely complete in 1842 when, in September, it received its most famous guest. As new monarch touring her kingdom, young Queen Victoria and her husband Prince Albert stayed at Taymouth Castle. The royal couple was so impressed they soon purchased a rural Scottish castle estate of her own upon which they built Balmoral Castle, which would become site of the royal family’s annual summer retreat in Aberdeenshire 75 miles northeast of Taymouth Castle.

In the 16th century the Earls of Breadalbane abandoned their fortress, Kilchurn Castle on Loch Awe, and moved east to their new home, Balloch Castle, just east of Loch Tay. In the early 19th century the Breadalbanes tore down most of Balloch Castle and built a grander, palatial home they named Taymouth Castle. The romantic ruins of medieval Kilchurn Castle still stand on an island in Loch Awe 40 miles west of Taymouth Castle. Photo © HOME AT FIRST.

 
In the 16th century the Earls of Breadalbane abandoned their fortress, Kilchurn Castle on
Loch Awe, and moved east to their new home, Balloch Castle, just east of Loch Tay. In
the early 19th  century the Breadalbanes tore down most of Balloch Castle and built a
grander, palatial home they named Taymouth Castle. The romantic ruins of medieval
Kilchurn Castle still stand on an island in Loch Awe 40 miles west of Taymouth Castle.

Photo
© HOME AT FIRST

          The long noble line of the Lords of Breadalbane ran out around the time of World War I. The remnants of the family sold off the great estate to farmers and householders. Fishermen were eager to have access to the trout and salmon of the River Tay that had so long be the private fishing stream of the Earls of Breadalbane. The castle itself was converted into a Highlands hotel that offered walking, fishing, and hunting to its guests. This was the time of great growth in golf in Scotland and beyond. The hoteliers decided to have a large portion of the deer park private hunting grounds by the castle made into a golf course. They imported — who better? — James Braid from Earlsferry, Fife. The prolific designer created a 12-hole private parkland course for the Taymouth Castle Hotel. Six new holes were added in the 1940s to complete the layout as it has existed — until the 2011 redevelopment project began.
          The grand sporting hotel proved less a draw than the dream had anticipated. The Thirties saw hard times in Scotland, and the Forties brought war to Britain. During World War II the hotel was commandeered by the government. It served as a hospital for wounded soldiers, then as a refugee center for displaced Poles, as a private school for children of American oilmen, and then, in the Sixties, fell into disuse and despair. There were always rumors. Pop diva Madonna was interested in the castle, but decided not to buy when she learned she could not close down the golf course, which by now had become a separate entity: a thriving private club that attracted a sizeable number of visitors to its pristine James Braid parkland course amid lush Highlands scenery.
          Then in 2005 an investment group announced that it had purchased the castle and its 450-acre estate and would immediately begin its ambitious development plan to convert Taymouth Castle into a 6-star (some reports said “7-star”) luxury resort hotel with 72 suites, at least 60 separate lodges and 26 timeshare homes scattered on the estate, along with an upgraded golf course and new equestrian center. The eastern Loch Tay region was abuzz with images of sudden prosperity. The £74 million project promised to create as many as 300 new jobs in the Kenmore-Aberfeldy area. The consortium bragged openly that the new Taymouth Castle resort hotel would, in the words of the project manager, “make Gleneagles (Resort Hotel 37½ miles south of Taymouth Castle, itself with two James Braid golf courses plus a
Jack Nicklaus course) look like a Salvation Army hostel.”

 

 
Compared to its regal castle neighbor, Taymouth Castle Golf Course's most recent clubhouse,
pro-shop, café, and practice facilities were simple, practical, and unassuming. However, it appears
the golf course may not have a brighter future than the now boarded-up, once-grand castle.

Photo
© HOME AT FIRST

          Only Taymouth Castle Golf Club members rankled at the grandiose proposal, upset that their relatively unknown James Braid course might not be available to them for some time, or might not be maintained properly during construction, or that it would soon be attracting international high-rollers and charging three-figure greens fees.
          Project completion was set for 2008. Construction began on shoring up the castle in 2005 and continued into 2006. Then, mysteriously, work suddenly stopped. Scaffolding leaned against portions of the castle, collecting spider webs and dust. Yellow construction site tape encircled Taymouth Castle, warning people away. In April, 2009, the investment group declared bankruptcy. One month later Taymouth Castle and its 450-acre estate was put up for sale.
          Late in 2010 it was announced that an investment group, Meteor Asset Management, had purchased Taymouth Castle and its estate, with an aim to create what had twice before had been attempted, and had twice before failed. The new vision, called Taymouth Castle Estate, promised a grand hotel and restaurant (and a new golf clubhouse) inside the richly refurbished castle, dozens of independent resort homes, and activities, including fishing, walking, shooting, and, especially, golf on the redeveloped 7,000+ yard Taymouth Castle Course. Although it was hoped the course would be ready for play by summer, 2012, as of this writing (February, 2015) the course continues to be closed with little more than rumors of cost-overruns, insufficient capitalization, investor pull-out, and insolvency to explain the cessation of the development on the once-again-stalled project. Meanwhile, the virtually pristine 1925 James Braid course lies fallow and partially destroyed by the earth-movers of the mostly anonymous and overly-ambitious developers.

THE COURSE AND SOME NOTABLE HOLES
          For most of its existence Taymouth Castle Golf Club has operated under-the-radar using one of James Braid’s least-known courses. The estate had arranged with the neighboring Kenmore Hotel to oversee the management of the golf course. The nearly 500-year-old hotel, in turn, offered golf on the Taymouth Castle course as an attraction to lure new guests. The course has always been beautifully maintained: lush and green with soft, forgiving greens, and wild, thick, tall, rough right to the edge of the fairways. Oddly for a Braid course, 17 of the holes at Taymouth Castle played straight. Braid is usually credited as inventing the dogleg as a way to add challenge to parkland courses. At Taymouth, only the 17th hole doglegs: a left turn at the half-way mark of its 330 yards. The newly redeveloped course promises not only 1,000 more yards of distance but 18 holes designed in keeping with James Braid's vision of the proper features for challenging, interesting golf.

Looking across the rough that separates the 2nd from the 12th fairways at Taymouth Castle Golf Course. Photo © HOME AT FIRST.

 
Looking across the rough that separates the original 2nd fairway
from the 12th fairway at Taymouth Castle Golf Course.

Photo © HOME AT FIRST

          Playing Braid's Taymouth Castle course was great fun, but, because of the nearly impossible rough, more fun for straight hitters. The original course was short by modern standards playing 6,092 yards from the whites (par 69, SSS 69), not very hilly, and rarely tight. (The redeveloped course is projected to total 7,039 yards and requires 72 strokes to make par.) Curiously antiquated for a 1920s design, Braid's Taymouth Castle was an out-and-back course, with holes 6 though 9 furthest from the clubhouse. Since the course lies on bottom land surrounded mostly by mature trees (except holes 11-15 that the cluster in the middle of the layout), wind rarely has been a major factor at Taymouth Castle. Nor has water affected any holes after the first five. A burn has crossed the fairways of Hole 1 (“Inchadney”, at a strategic point) and Hole 5 (“Lawers”, at a less strategic point). Hole 3 (“Rhevardh”) has reached the burn where it swells into a pond near the green. But Hole 4 (“Surprise”, par-3, 170 yards) has required a delicate tee shot around a tree and diagonally over the pond to reach the green, itself protected by trees in the back and bunkers right and left.

The 5th (ladies') tee at Taymouth Castle Golf Course. The par-5, 543-yard (467 from the red tees) 5th is the #1 handicap hole and features a burn (creek) crossing, a blind second shot, and an impressive view of Ben Lawers, Scotland's 12th highest mountain. Photo courtesy Taymouth Castle Golf Course.

 
The 5th (ladies') tee at Braid's original Taymouth Castle Golf Course. The Par-5, 543-yard (467
yards from the red tees) 5th has been the #1 handicap hole, featuring a burn (creek) crossing,
a blind second shot, and an impressive view of Ben Lawers, Scotland's 12th highest mountain.

Photo courtesy Taymouth Castle Golf Course

          The original Taymouth Castle course provided some lovely, local Scottish golf idiosyncrasies. Despite being essentially straight and short, the course featured several blind shots, but no caddies to help. An especially noteworthy example occurred on the long (543 yards), humpbacked, #1 handicap, par-5 Hole 5 (“Lawers”), a hole transformed from conventional to memorable by the challenge of shooting blind over the crest of the fairway that hid any sight of the green with but 120 yards to go. Fairways and greens were separated by deep rough, trees, and occasional oddities. The deep depression of a well trapped wayward shots on Hole 2 (“Beardy’s Well”) and parallel Hole 12 (“Baillie’s”). A low, rude, wooden fence separated the second green from the second fairway: local rules permitted a free drop away from the “log pole fencing” here.
          More distracting to first-time players at the original Taymouth Castle course was the outstanding scenery, especially the views of hulking
Ben Lawers — Scotland’s 12th highest mountain — visible from the high holes of the turn, the hump of the 5th, the length of the 7th, and the elevated tee of the 8th. But while the natural setting of the course convinced golfers they are deep in the Highlands of Scotland, the most memorable images from any round here were of lordly Taymouth Castle itself, seen from different vantages along almost half the track at Holes 2, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, and 18. Playing the long but wide open Hole 18 (“Castle”, par-4, 469 yards) home past the castle could be thrilling to first-timers at Taymouth. At the 250-yard mark the 18th fairway dropped off the table ten vertical yards to reach the final approach to the final green. From just above the drop-off not only was the pretty lower half of the 18th hole laid before you, but so was the length of the façade of the castle, not more than 100 yards to the left of the lower fairway. Golfers who correctly landed their drives at the top of the falls had a majestic second shot to the green awaiting them, made all the more impressive by the regal edifice — with or without scaffolding — lording over the almost temporary clubhouse to the left.

The downhill, par-4, 383-yard 8th hole is the westernmost hole and furthest from home on the Taymouth Castle course. It's one of the "new" holes added after James Braid designed the first 12 holes. Its elevated tee and view of Ben Lawers remind you this course is in the Highlands of Perthshire, Scotland. Photo © HOME AT FIRST.

 
The downhill, par-4, 383-yard 8th hole has been the westernmost hole and furthest from home
on the Taymouth Castle course. It was one of six "new" holes added in the 1940s after
James Braid designed the first 12 holes. Its elevated tee and view of Ben Lawers
reminded you the course is indeed in the Highlands of Perthshire, Scotland.

Photo © HOME AT FIRST

RECOMMENDATION: FOUR STARS
          James Braid's original and expanded Taymouth Castle course invited play, if only to experience its magnificent setting and history. Many scratch golfers found it too short or too straight. High handicappers found its rough cost them a bucket of balls to get through eighteen. But no one complained about the experience of playing golf on a classic Braid course in prototypical Highlands scenery on the former estate of the Earls of Breadalbane. If and when a new, longer, resort course is built to replace Braid's venerable course, golfers are sure to enjoy the setting as much as the golf itself. In this sense, at least, playing a round at Taymouth Castle will be both memorable and satisfying.
          As for Taymouth Castle, we wish the old gal well, but, frankly, not too well. We feel there are plenty enough Gleneagles resorts in this world, and, sadly, too many already encroaching on classic courses around Scotland. We would prefer to see the castle redone as a solid, but not too grand country hotel of three or four stars, with a comfortable — but not posh — restaurant and convivial pub. No helipads. No Range Rover off-road test courses. Horses might be nice, but nothing too, too, terribly, terribly, please. Fishing in the river — sure, but only within the limits needed to supply the hotel’s restaurant. Shooting? No. Disturbs the golfers, the fish, and the horses. And, as much as possible, leave Braid's original golf course as it was. Please keep it "exclusive" in the "not well-known" sense, rather than in the "expensive and elitist" connotation. It has been a monument to a simpler time — a time that still can be found here in the Highlands, a time when Nature and Golf co-existed rather than competed, before Bertha was Big, before woods were metal, and before James Braid and his seminal philosophy of golf course design was largely bulldozed.


 

TAYMOUTH CASTLE GOLF COURSE, KENMORE, CENTRAL SCOTLAND

 — COURSE CLOSED FOR REDEVELOPMENT —

 

LENGTH & PAR: 18 Holes
White Tees: 6,092* yds, Par-69, SSS 69
Yellow Tees: 5,734 yds, Par-69, SSS 67
Red Ladies' Tees: 5,242 yds, Par-72, SSS 72

* Some scorecards show 6,066 yards from the white tees, with the 26 yards of difference at Hole 18.

GREEN FEES (through2010):
April through September:

Weekdays (Mo-Fr): £27/round, £44/day

Weekends (Sa-Su): £32/round, £54/day
October through March:
Daily (Mo-Su): £15/round

FACILITIES (through2010):
Buggy (motorized cart) rental: £22/round
Trolley (pull cart rental): £4/round
Golf Club Rental: £12.50/round
Clubhouse with Bar & Café

One gothic arched gateway to the Taymouth Castle estate and golf course is on the east end of Kenmore village square. Another arched gateway opens onto the estate from the A827 road about two miles east of Kenmore toward Aberfeldy. Photo courtesy Sean Hinnegan © Home At First.
One gothic arched gateway to the
Taymouth Castle estate and golf
course is on the east end of Kenmore
village square. Another arched
gateway opens onto the estate
from the A827 road about two miles
east of Kenmore toward Aberfeldy
.
Photo courtesy Sean Hinnegan © HOME AT FIRST

Pro Shop
Practice Area

 

Visitors: Welcomed daily year round.

RESERVATIONS Advance reservations recommended, especially for weekend play.

PLACING RESERVATIONS: Currently not possible.
The Taymouth Castle clubhouse had operated daily from April through September. From October through March, the clubhouse was not staffed to receive tee-time reservations, and bookings were made through the neighboring Kenmore Hotel.
Tel: +44 (0)1887 830228 (course clubhouse) April thru Sept.
Tel: +44 (0)1887 830205 (Kenmore Hotel) October thru March.
Email: o.Kelly@btconnect.com April thru September.
Email: reception@kenmorehotel.com October thru March.

Or, once the course is up and running again, let HOME AT FIRST pre-reserve your golf tee-times at Taymouth Castle Golf Course as part of your independent, fly/drive vacation to Scotland. HOME AT FIRST adds no booking charge for this service.

Nearest Home At First Lodging Locations: Taymouth Castle Golf Course is within reach of HOME

The Kenmore Hotel on the village square in Kenmore is the acting concessionaire for Taymouth Castle Golf Course. Tee-time bookings for October through March are made through the hotel. Photo © HOME AT FIRST.
The historic Kenmore Hotel on the
 village square in Kenmore was
the acting concessionaire for
Taymouth Castle Golf Course.

Photo © HOME AT FIRST

AT FIRST locations in or near Scotland's
CENTRAL HIGHLANDS (5-60 minutes distance).

LOCATION: Taymouth Castle Golf Course clubhouse is one mile east of the village of Kenmore, at the eastern end of Loch Tay (18 miles east of the town of Killin at the western end of Loch Tay) in Perthshire, Central Scotland. The golf course is within reach of HOME AT FIRST lodging locations throughout CENTRAL SCOTLAND.

ADDRESS: Taymouth Castle Golf Course, Kenmore, Perthshire, PH15 2N1, Scotland.

DIRECTIONS TO TAYMOUTH CASTLE GOLF COURSE:
FROM HOME AT FIRST’S CENTRAL SCOTLAND LODGINGS: take the A827 northeast 17 miles from Killin to into the Kenmore village square. The Kenmore Hotel is on the left (north) side of the square. Pass through Taymouth Castle estate’s crenellated gothic arch at the eastern end of the square. Drive 1¼ miles along the estate road to the castle.

OTHER NEARBY GOLF CLUBS:

Kenmore Golf Course (9 holes) – Kenmore, 5min W of Taymouth Castle along the north bank of the River Tay.

Aberfeldy Golf Club – Aberfeldy, 10min E of Taymouth Castle GC

Killin Golf Club (9 holes), Killin

Pitlochry Golf Club (18 holes; Willie Fernie design), Pitlochry, 20 miles NE of Taymouth Castle GC.

Dunkeld & BIRNAM GC (18 holes), Dunkeld, 22 miles E of Taymouth Castle GC.

St. Fillans Golf Club (9 holes; Willie Auchterlonie design), St. Fillans, 34 miles SW of Taymouth Castle GC. Sandy Lyle holds the course record here.

Crieff Golf Club (18 holes & 9 holes; James Braid design), Crieff, 27 miles S of Taymouth Castle GC.

Comrie Golf Club (9 holes), Comrie, 34 miles S of Taymouth Castle.

Callander Golf Club (18 holes; designed by Old Tom Morris and Willie Fernie), Callander, 39 miles SW of Taymouth Castle GC.

Gleneagles Golf Resort (2 Braid courses & 1 Jack Nicklaus course), Auchterarder, 38 miles S of Taymouth Castle GC.

THE REGION

          Kenmore, home of Taymouth Castle, is on the eastern edge of Scotland's Central Highlands. About 15 miles west of Kenmore are the beautiful mountains and lochs of Scotland's Loch Lomond & Trossachs National Park, home also to HOME AT FIRST's Central Scotland travel program. The central region is the ideal base for touring throughout most of Scotland. The central region features unmatched natural beauty, and an outstanding array of outdoor activities: golf, fishing, walking, cycling, whitewater kayaking, and much more. Walkers will enjoy walking in great scenery along the lochs and climbing up Munros like Ben Lawers and other high mountains in the area. The many handsome villages and towns of Central Scotland provide visitors a genuine welcome, wonderful restaurants, and a complete selection of services.
         
There’s plenty of golf and lots more to do in Central Scotland. Within reach are St. Andrews and the Fife Coast to the east, Ben Nevis, the Grampian mountains, Loch Ness, and the Inner Hebrides isles of Mull and Iona to the west, and the great cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow to the southeast and southwest respectively. Scottish history interests many visitors. Several notable castles including STIRLING, CAMPBELL, Blair Athol, and EDINBURGH castles, may be visited as day-trips from Central Scotland. Several local Scotch Whisky distilleries are worth a visit including Aberfeldy, Blair Athol, Edradour, Glen Turret, and others.

 

SCOTLAND'S CENTRAL HIGHLANDS
LOOKING WEST ALONG LOCH TAY FROM KENMORE TOWARD BEN LAWERS
(
in the clouds, right center above), THE TALLEST MOUNTAIN IN THE REGION.
Photo
© Home At First

TRAVELING TO SCOTLAND TO PLAY GOLF?
Let
HOME AT FIRST make your advance tee-times at golf courses throughout Central Scotland and all regions of Scotland as part of your pre-reserved Scottish trip itinerary. There’s no extra charge for this service.

MORE RESOURCES:
Golf in Scotland
Home At First's
SCOTLAND travel program

Want to learn about other courses throughout the British Isles
including some of the greatest tests of golf in the world? See our
SCOTLAND, IRELAND, ENGLAND, and WALES
Course Guides for more information.

— HOME AT FIRST —